A former traffic inspector with Sudbury police is vowing to appeal after he was dismissed from his job for 36 convictions under the Police Services Act.

Gary Lavoie has no comment since he's appealing, but his father, Joe Lavoie, says his son was unfairly targeted.

Joe Lavoie

Joe Lavoie is the father of long-serving member of Greater Sudbury Police, Gary Lavoie. The junior Lavoie has received the harshest penalty possible related to the numerous Police Services Act charges he faced. Joe Lavoie said his son could have simply retired and avoided the charges. (Kate Rutherford/CBC)

Sgt. Gary Lavoie

Sgt. Gary Lavoie has been with the Greater Sudbury Police service for the past three decades. Most of Police Services Act charges against him relate to running the names of family and prospective tenants through the police record checks systems.

The elder Lavoie, who was also a long-time police officer, said his son could have simply retired and avoided the charges.

“It wasn't right. He's a man of his faith. And he decided to take a go at it. By himself. He's not a lawyer. He did exceptionally well,” Joe Lavoie said.

Lavoie was given the harshest penalty possible.

Adjudicator Dan Markiewich said Lavoie's actions tarnished the reputation of his fellow officers and caused the public to lose faith in the police service.

Most of the charges relate to Lavoie running the names of family and prospective tenants through the police record checks systems.

Deputy Chief Al Lekun said it's important the public know their information is protected.

“The information is there for one purpose and one purpose only, and that's for a bona fide law enforcement purpose,” he said.

While Lavoie loses his job and benefits, he retains his pension as he moves forward with an appeal.