Flooding on the James Bay coast has displaced hundreds of people from several First Nations communities.

The evacuees are now being temporarily housed in Kapuskasing, Thunder Bay, Cornwall and Sudbury.

About 80 people from Moosonee — including seniors, small children and pregnant women — arrived in the Nickel City over the weekend.

The assistant deputy minister with Emergency Management Ontario said evacuation this year was abrupt, as the temperatures changed quickly.

Allison Stuart  said she doesn't know how long the evacuees will stay in Sudbury.

"The decision will be made by mother nature, how the spring break-up unfolds," she said.

An emergency management officer with the City of Greater Sudbury has been working closely with the evacuees. Carolyn Salem said "they are actually in very good spirit and, of course, they are looking forward to returning to their home."

"We've actually had a number of people speaking to our Red Cross representatives, really commending the city and the Red Cross for the level of service they've received and how welcomed they've been feeling in the community," she said. "So they're doing very, very well."

Salem noted the municipality of Moosonee will cover the expenses incurred during the evacuation.

Flood warnings persist

Other people forced to leave Moosonee are being housed in Temiskaming Shores.

The Ministry of Natural Resources said several areas in the region are under a flood warning.

A flood warning has been issued for the Blanche River watershed system — from the Kirkland Lake area down to Lake Temiskaming.

Flood warnings are also in place for the Ivanhoe River watershed, affecting the Chapleau and Foleyet area.

The MNR said a flood warning is also in place for the Montreal River watershed and affects several areas, including Latchford, Elk Lake, Matachewan, New Liskeard, Cobalt and Haileybury.

A flood warning is also in place for the French River and Sturgeon River areas, while there is a flood watch for Lake Nipissing.