Blake Lapierre police interview shown at Sudbury stabbing trial

A videotaped interrogation of the accused in a Sudbury murder trial shows he did not seem disoriented or incoherent.
(Kate Rutherford/CBC)

A videotaped interrogation of the accused in a Sudbury murder trial shows he did not seem disoriented or incoherent.

The judge has advised the jury to pay attention to Blake Lapierre's state of mind and intent. The 20-year old is on trial for second degree murder in the death of a Justin Dagenais at a pit party at the end of August, 2012.

Detective-Constable Steve Bradley told Lapierre that he didn't see a killer before him, but that he saw a young man who made an error in judgement.

As the detective questioned him, Lapierre — who broke into tears at times — claimed that he too was a victim, and he was jumped at the pit party.

He also said he let someone else use his knife.

'Unlucky'

Later in the interview he said he dropped the knife on the trail out of the pit.

Lapierre, who was 18 at the time of the incident, said at first that he drank but took no drugs. He later changed that story to say he’d been taking mushrooms.

As the interview went on, Bradley described the surgeons reaching into the victim's chest and squeezing his heart to try to save him.

Bradley asked Lapierre, how he “ended up killing this guy?”

After a long silence, Lapierre said he didn't know.

At another point, Bradley described the unlucky stab through Dagenais’ heart.

Lapierre said it was unlucky for both of them. He also said he didn't mean to hurt anyone.

Bradley asked him if he was sorry for what happened.

Lapierre paused, then started crying again.

The defence starts its case on Monday.

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