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Banning smoking from public spaces 'good for business'

There will be fewer places to smoke in public by the end of this week when Ontario puts new restrictions in place to get smokers to butt out.
There will be fewer places to smoke in public by the end of this week, as Ontario introduces new restrictions to get smokers to butt out. (Canadian Press)

There will be fewer places to smoke in public by the end of this week when Ontario puts new restrictions in place to get smokers to butt out.

Smoking will no longer be permitted on bar and restaurant patios, playgrounds, and public sports fields and surfaces.

Local restaurant and bar manager Paul Loewenberg said the changes to Ontario's Smoke Free Act are good for business.

Paul Loewenberg operates the Laughing Buddha and Townehouse tavern restaurants in Sudbury. (CBC)
“People have always complained about smoking during the food service time, during lunch, during dinner,” the Laughing Buddha and Townehouse Tavern owner said.

“We think people will be happier about there not being any smoking in food service areas”

As will Sudburian Jamie Laprairie.

"I don't have a problem walking out to the parking lot. I made that choice to smoke and, if I have to do these things to keep my nasty habit, then so be it."

But some people, like Julie Dugas, wonder why the new rules are necessary.

"Some people don't want somebody sitting beside them smoking. That's understandable. But a bar? That's usually the only reason why you go outside is to go have a smoke."

The province is also outlawing the sale of tobacco on university and college campuses.

The government is aiming to have the lowest smoking rate in the country. Each year, tobacco claims 13,000 lives in Ontario, it reports—the equivalent to 36 lives every day.

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