Sudbury dietitian offers tips for successful New Year's resolutions

As we continue into 2018, some may be looking back at the promises they made for themselves this year and whether or not they’re sticking to them.
(marekuliasz/Shutterstock)
New Year's Day is now behind us, but already, some people have given up on their New Years' resolutions. Registered dietician Tammy Cheguis joined us with some advice that could help you keep your food related resolutions. 6:17

As we continue into 2018, some may be looking back at the promises they made for themselves this year and whether or not they're sticking to them.

A Sudbury dietitian says New Year's resolutions are easy to make but also easy to break.

"Why is it rare for people to keep a New Year's resolution to lose weight? That's because it's hard. It takes work," Tammy Cheguis said.

"I think a lot of people make New Year's resolutions and they're not really ready to make a serious change."

Cheguis says she recommends people stop focusing on losing weight and start make healthy changes to their lifestyle.

To successfully make those changes, Cheguis says it's important to be specific and start small.

Tammy Cheguis is a registered dietitian at the Sudbury and District Health Unit. (Markus Schwabe/CBC)

"You might say something like, I'm going to drink one large glass of water to replace one fancy coffee that I drink or a lemonade or a pop that I drink during the day," she said.

"Start with a small thing. Pick something specific."

Cheguis says if you have several resolutions, to not try and do them all at once.

"Small changes over time tend to work best," she said.

"When you try to change everything all at once, it sets people up for failure."

Also, she says not to get too upset if you break a resolution.

"You're going to fall off the bandwagon," she said. "Try not to be too hard on yourself."