Audio

15 years today: Adam Ranger, 5, killed by truck passing school bus

Fifteen years ago today, Pierre Ranger's life changed forever when his brother Adam was hit by a truck while getting off of his stopped school bus in North Bay.

Brother Pierre Ranger says of Adam, "I think he'd be a great man today"

Adam Ranger was just five years old when he was killed in 2000 by a truck that failed to stop for his school bus. These signs dot highways around the northeast now—a reminder to people to be mindful of stopped school buses. (Courtesy Timiskaming Road Safety Coalition)

Fifteen years ago today, Pierre Ranger's life changed forever when his brother Adam was hit by a truck while getting off of his stopped school bus in North Bay. 

"I often wonder what kind of man he would be, what he would do for a living, what his job would be," said Ranger. 

"But, I'll never get to find out because someone didn't stop for the bus lights." 

Ranger and his family have been trying to put their grief and anger to work. The "Let's Remember Adam" campaign was launched in memory of the little boy to make drivers think twice about passing a stopped school bus.

Pierre Ranger is reflecting on the painful moment he heard about his little brother's death. He spoke Wednesday morning with CBC Sudbury radio host Markus Schwabe: 

 

On mobile? Click here

This morning, the "Let's Remember Adam" committee payed tribute to the boy, who would now be 20 years old.

There was a minute of silence planned for parking lots around North Bay where school buses were to gather. At 9:30 a.m., they planned to flash their lights and extend their stop arms for a minute in remembrance.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.