An Alberta workplace bullying expert says office intimidation is on the rise across the country.

Linda Crockett is executive director of Alberta Bullying Research, Resources and Recovery.

Crockett said that there are common markers.

"They're using tactics to abuse other people in very subtle ways. Excluding people, isolating people, ostracizing them, basically," she said in an interview with Saskatoon Morning host Leisha Grebinski.

"Sabotaging behaviours, for example. Work goes missing, or they're not informed of important meetings."

Crockett

Workplace bullying expert Linda Crockett. (Alberta Bullying Research, Resources, Recovery Centre)

Crockett said the demands of the modern workplace can often lead to bullying. Staff work in high pressure environments and are called upon to do more work with less resources.

Plus, there's the fear factor.

Employees are worried about cutbacks and losing their jobs.

"It creates an environment of paranoia and competition, and people are becoming ruthless to get what they want and they're getting away with it."

Crockett said there are real costs associated with this. There is lost productivity, legal settlements, medical and insurance costs.

Her advice to workers who may be the victim of an office bully is to document all incidents and then take that information to management, or HR.