A Scottish member of the European parliament is calling for a retaliatory ban on Justin Bieber and Celine Dion after a federal agency detained a shipment of food products into Canada.

Last week, a Saskatoon specialty shop's shipment of Irn-Bru and Marmite from the UK was held at the border.

Irn Bru British Food Ban

Scottish drink Irn-Bru sold out soon after CBC News visited an Ottawa speciality food shop Friday, Jan. 24. (Andrew Foote/CBC)

Irn-Bru is a drink and Marmite is a yeast-based food spread.

"Scotland and Canada have strong cultural and historical links," said MEP Alyn Smith in a blog post.

"I'm sure many ex-pats across the pond will be worried about how to get their daily fix of the bru if this supposed ban remains. I think if it does, we need to look into banning Justin Bieber and Celine Dion here in Europe -- between them they've produced more sugary schmatlz than Irn-Bru ever has." "Scotland and Canada have strong cultural and historical links," said MEP Alyn Smith.

Now, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is clarifying what happened.

The agency said in a written statement that appropriate certification of food products is required to assure food safety and animal health.

This particular shipment was detained because it contained meat products that were not accompanied by the right paperwork.

The CFIA said that the products are still available in Canada.

Smith admits the Bieber ban was always a bit tongue-in-cheek.

"Well, this has obviously been a bit of fun," he said. "There was, essentially, a miscommunication over some imports. Irn-Bru, of course, is very close to our hearts in Scotland."

Just to show there are no hard feelings, Smith has sent a gift to the two entertainers.

"As a gesture of goodwill, I've sent Mr. Bieber and Ms. Dion a crate of Irn-Bru this morning," he said. "So, they can enjoy that, and they can sample our other national drink."