Grieving Saskatoon mom urges all to 'start taking responsibility' and keep drunk drivers off the road

There is a new campaign against drinking and driving, but it's not coming from the police or from Saskatchewan Government Insurance. Instead this urgent plea is coming direct from the broken heart of a Saskatoon mother.

Linda Van de Vorst lost son and his family to drunk driver

Linda Van de Vorst wants people to take action and do whatever it takes to stop people from driving drunk. (CBC)

There is a new campaign against drinking and driving, but it's not coming from the police or from Saskatchewan Government Insurance. Instead this urgent plea is coming direct from the broken heart of a Saskatoon mother.

"There are always going to be four missing," said Linda Van de Vorst.

Van de Vorst spoke with CBC about losing her son and his family in a deadly drunk driving crash almost two years ago. She is doing it because the Christmas season has arrived, and she is worried there will be more drunk drivers on the road.  

The crash at Wanuskewin Road and Highway 11 killed Chanda and Jordan Van de Vorst and their two children, Miguire, 2, and Kamryn, 5.

Catherine McKay, 49, pleaded guilty to four counts of impaired driving causing death. McKay had been driving with a blood alcohol level three times the legal limit. McKay is serving a 10-year sentence.

Jordan and Chanda Van de Vorst and their two-year-old son, Miguire and five-year-old daughter, Kamryn, were killed in January 2016. (Van de Vorst family vigil/Facebook)

Call to action

"It causes pain all the way around when someone dies because of an irresponsible decision," said Van de Vorst.

"We know how horrible it is to deal with the loss of our family, our grandchildren."

Van de Vorst is asking everyone to try and connect with that pain, to feel the potential consequences, and then to make the decision not to drive drunk.

But she goes further, urging people not to be passive bystanders but to instead take action and stop others from getting behind the wheel when they are impaired.  

"You have to do what it takes to save someone's life," Van de Vorst said.

"Start taking responsibility; take care of our families."