Saskatoon student Tanner Zekonic awarded $100K scholarship

Student debt should not be a problem for Saskatoon's Tanner Zekonic. The Grade 12 Mount Royal Collegiate student is one of 30 winners of the prestigious Loran Scholarship worth $100,000 for university studies.

Zekonic is one of 30 students across Canada to receive scholarship

Tanner Zekonic of Mount Royal High School plans to attend McGill University with his scholarship. (Rosalie Woloski/CBC)

Student debt should not be a problem for Saskatoon's Tanner Zekonic. The Grade 12 Mount Royal Collegiate student is one of 30 winners of the prestigious Loran Scholarship worth $100,000 for university studies.

"It's great to not be able to worry about student loans basically for the rest of my life," Zekonic told Saskatoon Morning host Leisha Grebinski.

It's great to not be able to worry about student loans basically for the rest of my life.- Grade 12 student Tanner Zekonic on being awarded the Loran Scholarship.

The scholarship focuses on three main criteria: character, commitment to service and leadership potential. Zekonic, who found out about the scholarship from his teachers last fall, knew his involvement in the community gave him a good shot at winning.

"I like to keep myself busy with sports and student council," he said. "I also work in the school's electronics program and I get a chance to do a lot of volunteer work with underprivileged kids." 

Zekonic had to maintain at least an 85 average in order to be considered for the scholarship. There were more than 3,800 applicants from across Canada and the final 76 were flown to Toronto last weekend for interviews with Loran members. It was a great learning experience for Zekonic.

"It's not just your typical job interview process. They ask you a lot of stuff about your character and how do you see yourself as a leader," he said. "And they ask where do you see yourself after university."

A career in chemical engineering is where the bright, young student sees his future. Zekonic plans on attending McGill ​University next fall and offered Grebinski a glimpse at how his future might shape out.

"I'd like to own my own engineering firm and be able to choose my own projects. I want to work for myself and have a close group of friends that I can work with."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.