Julia Clark's parents will watch their daughter compete on 'America's Favourite Quiz Show' from their home in Saskatoon tonight.

The 23-year-old will make her television debut in Canada on Jeopardy!. Clark says she's the only Canadian that she knows of who has tested their aptitude on the show's College Championships.

'Alex Trebek walked out and I was like 'wow, this is actually happening',' - Julia Clark

Julia grew up in Saskatoon, but is now in her fourth year of study at Harvard University. Julia's father, Keith Clark, says Julia has been preparing to play all her life.

"She's been a Jeopardy! fan since she was a small child," Clark said. "She was always sort of a trivia buff. I am too...we have that in common."
    
Clark got her chance to play after making it through rounds of elimination. She actually competed in the Jeopardy! College Championships in January.

Clark says the experience was surreal.

"Actually being there was absolutely fantastic," Clark told CBC News. "It actually didn't sink in until I heard the announcer saying my name and then Alex Trebek walked out and I was like 'wow, this is actually happening'.

The Jeopardy episode featuring Clark will air tonight in Canada.

UPDATE: Saskatoon woman scores $13,599 in Jeopardy!

A gutsy play in Final Jeopardy paid off big time for Saskatoon's Julia Clark Thursday night.

The Harvard University student had $6,800 before the final answer, but was well behind the other two contestants.

The category was Historic Places.

She wagered almost the whole thing: $6,799.

Here was the answer:  "Administered by the Army, its 1st graves were dug by former slave James Parks, the only one buried there who was born on the site."

Clark's question, "What is Arlington Cemetery?", was correct, bringing her final score to $13,599.

She still finished second, behind Eric Turner's $14,001, but her score was high enough to advance into next week's semi-finals. 

"I was really amazed at how great everyone was," Clark told CBC News.

"And how smart and funny and friendly and there wasn't really any tension at all. Everyone just wanted to see everyone else do well."