Saskatoon Métis artist Zoey Roy wins National Indspire Award

After winning the National Indspire Award, Saskatoon Métis artist Zoey Roy is braiding bannock so that her mother can attend the award ceremony with her in Vancouver.

Zoey Roy raises money so her mother can go to Vancouver award ceremony

Zoey Roy, winner of the National Indspire Award, and her mother Maxine Roy. (Rosalie Woloski/CBC)

When Saskatoon artist Zoey Roy won a national award for Métis youth, it originally looked like her mother wouldn't have enough money to attend the awards ceremony in Vancouver.

However, Roy isn't one to accept bad news easily.

Now, Roy is holding a fundraiser, selling braided bannock and soup so her mother can come along on the trip. For Roy, having her mother, Maxine, in the audience the night she receives the award is important to her healing journey.

"It's intergenerational trauma that we continue to unravel," she said. "I think that it's very important for me to have my mom there, because she's the one who brought me into this world, and it takes multiple generations to heal."

Roy held a fundraiser, selling braided bannock and soup so her mother can come along on the trip. (Chanss Lagaden/CBC)

Roy is travelling to the National Indspire Awards in Vancouver held next week. She's a well-known local poet, rapper and youth activist.

Roy still can't believe she won the award.

"I really think it's a message for kids like me who grew up in the core of Saskatoon, or who grew up transient," she said. "We never grew up a traditional indigenous lifestyle, and finding my identity was a true journey."

Roy said hosting a fundraiser using traditional Métis food just made sense.

'I knew since she was knee high to a grasshopper that she was going to be someone to look up to.'  - Maxine Roy

"Mom loves to make bannock and I took a picture on Instagram and hundreds of people liked it," said Roy.

There were 50 orders for bannock within the first hour. A Saskatoon cafe, d' Lish by Tish, has even agreed to sell it for her.

"I'm very proud of her. She's that wonderful wonderful person and a great daughter," said her mother, Maxine. "I knew since she was knee high to a grasshopper that she was going to be someone to look up to."  

There were 50 orders for bannock within the first hour. (Chanss Lagaden/CBC)

At 26, Roy is a published poet, as well as a University of Saskatchewan student where she is enrolled in the Faculty of Education.

She was also behind the Rock The Vote movement in Saskatchewan, which encouraged disenfranchised populations to make their voices heard in the 2011 federal election.