More Sask. employees having difficulty escaping part-time work: StatsCan

More Saskatchewan workers are finding a hard time getting out of part-time work, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

23 per cent of part-time workers want to work full-time, an increase of 2.8 percentage points

A new Statistics Canada report shows more people in Saskatchewan are having difficulty escaping part-time work. (LM Otero/Associated Press)

More Saskatchewan workers are finding a hard time getting out of part-time work, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

In the 2017 national review of the labour market, StatsCan found 23.6 per cent of part time workers in Saskatchewan said they would prefer full-time work. That's an increase of 2.8 percentage points, one of the highest increases in the country.

While most of national job growth last year was in full-time work, part-time jobs numbers still increased by 55,900 across the country.

Nationally, the report also found growth in temporary and contract employees was far outpacing job growth from permanent employees.

People in precarious work situations are at greater risk of spending their lives in poverty, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

While Saskatchewan noticed an increase in 2017, the province's involuntary part-time numbers were still lower than the national average (24.2 per cent) as well as Alberta (26.2 per cent).

Unemployment rate constant

Meanwhile, Saskatchewan's unemployment rate stayed steady at 6.3 per cent, mirroring the national average.

Average weekly earnings were up in Saskatchewan, climbing 2.2 per cent to $1,010/week.

Meanwhile, Indigenous people across the western provinces continue to have higher unemployment rates. 

Throughout western provinces, Indigenous people aged 25 to 54 with completed post-secondary education had an unemployment rate of 8.8 per cent. Among non-indigenous people, that rate sat at 4.5 per cent.

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