Dozens of people gathered in front of Jenny's Bridal in downtown Saskatoon to show their support for a woman who says she was refused service at the store because she is transgender.

The crowd cheered as Rohit Singh and her husband approached Saturday afternoon.

"I am damn happier than the day of my wedding," said Singh. "I never thought this kind of crowd would come to support me here in Saskatoon," she said.

Many people at the peaceful protest brought signs. One read "transgender rights are human rights," another read "support transgender rights."

The protesters also circulated a petition to the provincial government that calls for more human rights protection for transgender people.

According to transgender people like Miki Mappin, who was at the protest, the current language used in Saskatchewan's human rights law to protect the transgendered is too vague.

Mappin feels it needs to be tailored to address the specific discrimination the gender minority faces and hopes the 150 signatures they got Saturday is a step towards preventing others from being discriminated against in the future.

"I lost my job," said Mappin. "I wanted to go to human rights, but I was told I had to choose one of the acceptable grounds to file a human rights complaint — I didn't want to accuse my colleagues of sexual harassment because that is not what they had been doing," Mappin added.

Other protesters were demanding a boycott of the bridal shop. Peter Garden was there holding a sign that read "let's leave this bride at the altar — boycott Jenny's Bridal."

Garden owns Turning The Tide bookstore in Saskatoon. He said as a business owner he was offended by the way Singh was treated because she was transgender, and he hopes a boycott will teach the store owner a lesson.

"You know, I think that people make mistakes," said Garden.  "I think they have a chance to recognize them and apologize for them. I don't think that is what the owner of this business has done." 

Protesters remained in front of Jenny's Bridal for over an hour.