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According to Statistics Canada, in 2008, one-third of homicides or attempted murders involved knives. (TSA/Reuters)

Following the stabbings in Calgary and Regina, some people on social media have raised the debate over knife legislation and the banning of certain types of knives.

However, Eugene Schreiner has been making knives in Saskatoon for the past 65 years and he said a knife ban would be difficult to enforce.

"You can ban whatever you want, I mean, drugs are banned, everything is banned, but who can enforce it?" he said. "You know, are they going to take your kitchen knives away on you?"

University of Saskatchewan law professor Glen Luther agrees with Schreiner that banning knives is hard to do. 

"You have to realize, the criminal code definition of a weapon is a difficult thing to define," he said. "What is a weapon, what isn't a weapon, and in the case of knives, of course, we have all kinds of legal uses for them. All of us use a knife every day to butter our bread, or whatever, let alone hunting and fishing and butchers and chefs."

There are a couple of different kinds of knives currently prohibited under the Criminal Code. Those include spring-activated blades and brass-knuckle blades.

Across the country, the number of stabbing deaths has stayed fairly stable in the recent past. However, knives are still seen as the most common weapon used in crimes.

According to Statistics Canada, in 2008, one-third of homicides or attempted murders involved knives. That's more than any type of weapon, including guns. In the same year, knives were used against six per cent of victims of violent crime and firearms were used against two per cent of victims.

What do you think? Is there a way to control certain kinds of knives? What can be done to curb knife violence? What is your reaction to these stabbings? Leave your thoughts in the comment section at the bottom of the page.


Replay the Saskatoon Morning live chat that looked at whether some knives should be banned.