Francophones want better services at Saskatoon airport

More people are coming through Saskatoon's John G. Diefenbaker International Airport than ever, but that has some people calling for more services.

Airports with a million passengers are required to provide services in English and French

Airports with a million passengers are required to provide services in English and French. (CBC)

More people are coming through Saskatoon's John G. Diefenbaker International Airport, but that has some people calling for improved services.

Graham Fraser, Canada's Official Languages Commissioner, says not enough bilingual services are offered at Saskatoon's airport. He was in the city in August, 2012 to push for more signs and services to be available in both official languages.

Canadian airports with a million passengers a year are required to provide services in English and French. The first time the airport in Saskatoon hit the one million passenger mark was in 2009.

While some signs and services are available in both official languages, many are not. (CBC)

While some signs and services are available in both official languages, many are not.

Eric Lefol, manager with the Fédération des Francophones de Saskatoon, said the lack of French signage and services is frustrating.

"We have asked several times," Lefol said. "We have had a few meetings and if nothing comes, we will ask officially to the office of official languages to take an action." 

While Lefol said it's not something that is easily enforced, he said signs, public announcements, screening and check-in services should be available in English and French.

"Not all airports accepted to do it," Lefol said. "In Regina we have better bilingual services, but in Saskatoon it is still slow. So we hope it will come now."

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