Distracted driving has become the number one contributing factor in Saskatchewan motor vehicle crashes.

Saskatchewan Government Insurance says in 2016, distracted driving led to 42 deaths and 1,205 injuries.

"It's important to remember no text, no phone call, no tweet or Instagram post is worth a $280 fine or four points on your licence," said SGI spokesman Tyler McMurchy. "It's certainly not worth injuring someone or potentially killing someone."

Although distracted driving is contributing to the most crashes, statistics in last year's annual report by SGI show conviction rates are dropping.

Sask distracted driving convictions

Despite lower conviction rates, SGI said distracted driving has become the number one contributing factor in Saskatchewan collisions. (CBC)

McMurchy noted that unlike a blood alcohol test, it is not always easy for police to confirm whether a driver in a crash was distracted at the moment of impact.

Drivers who die in a crash cannot be convicted of any offence.

"We have seen an increase in collisions, an increase in injuries, and an increase in fatalities when it comes to collisions related to distracted driving," McMurchy said.

Photo Speed Enforcement Sask

SGI says it is seeing fewer collisions as a result of the photo speed enforcement pilot. (CBC)

Speed cameras reducing collisions: SGI

McMurchy said SGI is seeing fewer collisions as a result of the photo speed enforcement pilot.

Over the last five years, SGI said motorists used to average 97 crashes per year in the areas where speed cameras  were installed. Since the cameras went in, the government insurance agency said that average has dropped to 72 crashes each year.

School zone speed convictions Sask

Fewer people were convicted of speeding through school zones in 2016. (CBC)

"Honestly we'd be happy if no motorists got a single photo speed enforcement ticket," said McMurchy.

He said many drivers are becoming wary of school zones, where speeding tickets begin at $140 and increase with each kilometre motorists are clocked driving over the limit.