Colten Boushie's family takes message to United Nations

Family and supporters of Colten Boushie, a young Cree man who was shot and killed on a Saskatchewan farm in 2016, have taken their message to the United Nations in New York City.

Red Pheasant Cree Nation man died of gunshot wound in August 2016

Colten Boushie's mother, Debbie Baptiste, his uncle Alvin Baptiste and others are at the United Nations in New York City. They'll present at a forum on Indigenous people on Wednesday. (supplied)

Family and supporters of Colten Boushie have taken their message to the United Nations in New York City.

"I'm there to bring attention to injustice that's been happening throughout Canada," Boushie's uncle, Alvin Baptiste, said in an interview Monday during a break between sessions of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Boushie, a 22-year-old Red Pheasant Cree Nation man died of a gunshot wound to the head in August, 2016. Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley was recently acquitted in a high-profile trial at Battleford's Court of Queen's Bench.

Baptiste says the court case may be over, but the family and supporters are continuing to fight for justice — not just for Boushie, but all Indigenous people.

Baptiste and others are in New York and will speak Tuesday and Wednesday.

Delegates know Boushie's story

Delegates at the United Nations already know the Red Pheasant Cree Nation man's story, said North Battleford lawyer and Boushie family friend Eleanore Sunchild. Sunchild says delegates from around the world have followed the case closely.

Alvin Baptiste and others are at the United Nations in New York City. They'll speak Wednesday about justice for Indigenous people. (supplied)

"We don't have to explain about Colten because people already know. They seem to already know exactly who he is and what happened to him," Sunchild said.

Others attending include Boushie's mother, Debbie Baptiste, his cousin, Jade Tootoosis and Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations vice-chief David Pratt.

The two-week session began at the United Nations general assembly hall Monday with speeches and performances by American, Bolivian and Russian Indigenous people.

Baptiste, Sunchild and others met with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on a recent trip to Ottawa.

One issue they raised was the apparent absence of Indigenous jurors in Colten Boushie's case.

Shortly after, the federal government said it would consider a series of changes, which include reforms to Canada's jury selection process.

About the Author

Jason Warick

Reporter

Jason Warick is a reporter with CBC Saskatoon.