Trucks moved from makeshift parking lot after neighbours complain of noise

Dozens of trucks from the Regina Bypass project had been parking on land in a residential neighbourhood in east Regina — and neighbours weren't happy about it.

Trucks were parked on land owned by Kawacatoose First Nation

Dozens of trucks parked across the street from Lonny Regan's building in east Regina. (Submitted by Lonny Regan)

Dozens of trucks from the Regina bypass project had been parking on land in a residential neighbourhood in east Regina — and neighbours weren't happy about it. 

Lonny Regan lives in a condo complex on Eastgate Drive in Regina. He said trucks from the bypass had been parking on a makeshift parking lot across the street since around Christmas. 

"They've been coming and going just about all day, all night, making a lot of noise, dumping their sand and stuff in the lot here," said Regan. 

"It's been keeping the residents awake at night because it's a seniors' complex."

Regan said several of his neighbours had called the city to complain, but "they've been getting a runaround from the city because it's private land and they can't do anything about it."

Ownership

The land in question is owned by Kawacatoose First Nation.

Darin Poorman is the director of operations for Kawacatoose First Nation, and he said no one had any idea the trucks were parked there. 

He said no one was given permission to park there.

"You just can't go parking stuff on land without consent," said Poorman. 

He said that, according to Kawacatoose First Nation's legal counsel, a nearby hotel had told the drivers to park there. Once the problem was brought to the hotel staff's attention by the lawyer, the staff said they would tell the drivers to not park there anymore.

As of Friday afternoon, only one truck was still parked on the land.

Poorman said the land was intended for development. Now Kawacatoose First Nation plans to assess the land to see if any damage was done by the trucks.