Maygan Sensenberger and her husband, Manitoba Senator Rod Zimmer, will be allowed to communicate by telephone and electronically, after a Saskatoon judge agreed to loosen the conditions of a no-contact order put in place after Sensenberger was charged following a ruckus on an Air Canada flight five days ago.

Sensenberger, 23, is facing charges of causing a disturbance and uttering threats following an incident on a flight from Ottawa to Saskatoon during which it is alleged she threatened her 69-year-old husband.

On Wednesday, the judge assigned to the case was told by a Crown prosecutor that Sensenberger said she would slit the man's throat. The prosecutor said other passengers on the flight were frightened and upset.

However, the court also heard that Zimmer was not frightened and wants to see his wife.

Sensenberger is also keen to see her husband.

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Rod Zimmer, a Liberal member of the Senate from Manitoba, arrives for his wife's court appearance Wednesday. (Dan Kerslake/CBC )

The couple married one year ago and spent their first anniversary apart due to a non-contact order.

The Crown asked for the order to remain in place.

The judge eased the conditions, allowing the couple to communicate over the phone and using electronic methods. However, they are not allowed to be together in person.

On Tuesday, during a brief court appearance, the senator's wife learned that the prosecution had dropped a charge relating to the incident.

The Crown withdrew a charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft. That charge carries a maximum sentence of life in prison under the Criminal Code.

Saskatoon police arrested Sensenberger last week after she allegedly caused a ruckus on a flight from Ottawa. Police alleged she yelled about bringing down the plane and threatened Zimmer.

But a witness said Sensenberger was simply worried about her husband's health and wanted him to get help for breathing problems he was having during the flight.

The witness, Scott Wright, said the crew gave Zimmer oxygen and he started feeling better, but his wife was still upset and they fought over his condition.

Sensenberger's next court date is Sept. 18.

With files from CBC's Dan Kerslake