Around 600 people gathered at the Saskatchewan Science Centre in Regina to watch Monday's solar eclipse.

Woman viewing the eclipse in Regina

The Saskatchewan Science Centre provided glasses to people who paid admission to watch Monday morning's Space Show. (Kirk Fraser/CBC)

Lineups went around the building for the special eclipse viewing glasses that allow people to safely stare at the sun without damaging their retinas. 

The glasses were provided to people who paid admission to watch Monday morning's Space Show.

Gail Gray, a self-described geek, said she had been waiting for the eclipse for about a year. She took time off from her job so she could drive down from Saskatoon for the event.

"It was pretty exciting when we first noticed it," Gray said.

Gail Gray and Sean Allan

Gail Gray and Sean Allan take in Monday's eclipse at the Saskatchewan Science Centre in Regina. (Kirk Fraser/CBC)

"That made it real — and when I could see this tiny little divot out of the upper right corner of the sun, you knew it was starting — it was actually happening."

Family viewing the eclipse in Regina

People of all ages took in the eclipse, which isn't set to happen again for another seven years. (Kirk Fraser/CBC)

The eclipse started at about 10:30 a.m. CST. Southern parts of the province saw about 80 per cent of the sun obscured at 11:46 a.m. 

The Science Centre issued warnings that those who viewed the eclipse without the aid of special viewing glasses would suffer serious eye damage.

In fact, the centre said, staring directly at the sun during the eclipse is worse because your pupils will dilate to take in more light as the sun becomes obscured. Then, when the sun comes back out, the eyes will be flooded with light and cause even worse damage.

With files from Brandon Harder