Saskatchewan teachers reject tentative agreement

About 63 per cent of Saskatchewan teachers have voted to reject the latest proposed contract.

63% vote against deal that would have meant 7.3% increase over 4 years

About 63 per cent of Saskatchewan teachers have voted to reject the latest proposed contract. The voter turnout was 98 per cent.

The four-year tentative agreement between the provincial government/school boards and the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation (STF) would have included a 7.3 per cent pay increase as well as a $700 payment in the first year.

The agreement would also have provided funding for a new teachers' regulatory and disciplinary body in Saskatchewan.

After news of the vote was announced Monday, the government/school board trustees bargaining committee released a statement expressing disappointment. 

"It is clear there is a disconnect between the STF Bargaining Committee and its members," government/trustees bargaining committee spokeswoman Connie Bailey said. "We expect the STF will be in contact with us in the coming weeks."

The STF said it will immediately apply for conciliation, a non-binding process where a third-party is brought in to try to bridge the differences between the two sides.

It's the second time in less than a year that Saskatchewan's teachers voted no to a tentative agreement. In October, they voted 73 per cent against a deal that would have seen them receive a pay hike of 5.5 per cent plus a one per cent lump sum payment.

In a news release, the STF said its members say the most recent deal "did not contain sufficient resources" and did not properly address such concerns as the school year, school day and workload matters.

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