Saskatchewan Party claims $125M in savings from Lean program

While the Saskatchewan Party praised savings from the Lean health care project at the legislature on Monday, the opposition wasn't buying the numbers.

NDP Leader Cam Broten calls the numbers 'baloney'

NDP Leader Cam Broten challenged the Saskatchewan Party's claim that the Lean program saved the province $125 million. (CBC)

While the Saskatchewan Party praised savings from the Lean health care project at the legislature on Monday, the opposition wasn't buying the numbers.

The government said that Lean increased productivity and saved the province $125 million, offering spreadsheets to show how the calculations were made.

Premier Brad Wall praises the Lean health project. (CBC)

However, NDP Leader Cam Broten said those numbers are inflated.

"They've made the spreadsheets to try to stand on some sort of plank, but it doesn't hold water in my view," Broten said.

Broten said the number would look different if expenses were taken into account such as hotel costs for John Black of the U.S. company John Black and Associates, which brought the Lean initiative to Saskatchewan, and the use of Japanese senseis.

"It's like $125,000 or something like that, just a pittance," Broten said.

The government ended its $35-million dollar contract with John Black and Associates a couple of months ago.

The program meant to find inefficiencies in the health care system was supposed to last until the end of March.

The Government of Saskatchewan released the document below to explain the savings calculations from the Lean program. See the numbers for yourself. On mobile? Click here to view the document.

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