Saskatchewan inventor scores big on Kickstarter

A Yorkton, Sask., man who has a dream of bringing cheap 3D printers to the world has found Kickstarter investors beating a path to his door.

Yorkton man hopes his cheap 3D printers will change the world

A Yorkton, Sask., man who has a dream of bringing cheap 3D printers to the world has found Kickstarter investors beating a path to his door.

Rylan Grayston recently turned to the crowdfunding website to find investors for his $100 Peachy 3D printer kit.

"It actually comes from the fact that I just wanted a 3D printer, but I couldn't afford one," he told Morning Edition host Sheila Coles.

Launching his Kickstarter on Friday, he was seeking $50,000, but by Wednesday afternoon, more than $400,000 had been pledged. There's still another 25 days left in his crowd-funding campaign.

It's money from people making donations to his project and, in many cases, pre-ordering and purchasing printers.

Grayston's team (his brother Nathan is his business partner) isn't ready to ship the printers yet.

Over the next few months, they plan to do a little more research and development, work out the kinks, source parts and then make the orders and ship them.

Grayston hopes people will have the printers in their possession by next summer. 

3D printing is a fast-growing technology and enthusiasts use them to make jewelry, machine parts and other small, intricate items.

However, many of the machines cost thousands of dollars.
Grayston believes it could change the world if the price could be brought down.
"It's like technology's answer to the magic wand," he said.  "Imagine a world where products can go viral."

Despite the phenomenal success of his Kickstarter, Grayston insists he's no genius.

"I don't want to be put on a pedestal," he said. "This is something anybody could have done if they took an entire year to think about it."

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