The Saskatchewan SPCA is looking for help taking care of 25 horses it seized late last month as part of a mistreatment investigation.

"There was some concern with inadequate feed with some of the animals, inadequate water, just in general poor care," said Kaley Pugh, manager of Animal Protection Services for the provincial SPCA."The horses we're dealing with had access to water issues, there are mares that are about to foal without adequate care, the horses have parasite concerns, they all need to have their feet done, things like that."  

The Saskatoon-based agency says it's already spent $7,000 caring for the animals and is facing ongoing costs feeding and caring for them until new owners can be found. Seized from a Wynyard-area farm last month were seven bred brood mares, one mature stallion, one weanling, three colts, seven fillies and two miniature horses.

Also seized were two mares with foals that are already with a caregiver, the agency said.

The SPCA is requesting an adoption fee of $150 per animal to defray feed and care costs.

Right now, the horses have been placed in emergency care, but now the SPCA is looking for one temporary caretaker to take all the horses before a permanent, long term home is found.

"I think placing the whole group is going to be a challenge," Pugh said. "The biggest concern is going to be that these horses should really be quarantined. So if people have their own animals, they should really be kept separate for disease and parasite concerns."

However, the SPCA isn't looking to give these horses to just anyone. They want to make sure the temporary caregiver is able to give them the care they need. 

"We do have a questionnaire we're asking people to fill out, to get an idea as to what sort of facilities they have, what sort of experience they have, if they're interested in individual horses, or the younger horses, but not the stallions," she said.

The SPCA also seized a number of other animals from the farm, including 20 cats, 10 sheep and goats and several dogs.  Pugh says the SPCA will be charging the horses' former owners in the courts. However, it may take a while for criminal charges to go before a judge.

"It does take some time to get the paperwork done. We have six months to do it. It won't take six months, but it probably won't be today either. It will take a few days."

The SPCA says anyone who wants more information or wants to help with the horses' care can call Kaley Pugh   at (306) 382-2418.