The Lost Stories Project created permanent public works of art to unsung heroes and untold Canadian stories and now a group in Regina wants to keep it going on a local level. 

Kristin Enns-Kavanagh, the executive director of the Saskatchewan History and Folklore Society (SHFS), helped to shine a light on the story of Yee Clun. 

She said the idea to continue to foster this kind of work came from members of the community.

"They didn't want this to be a one off, it would be nice if it could spur some kind of further work," she said. 

The project will again focus on the Heritage neighbourhood, largely due to conversations Enns-Kavanagh had in the area with locals. The group wants to focus on other hidden histories in the area, or its "intangible cultural heritage" she said.

"This is really giving recognition to the fact that there's so much beneath the surface, that you can't see unless you live in the community or you know somebody," said Enns-Kavanagh.

Citing the difficulty in finding the stories, the SHFS held a workshop last week to try and suss out some of these stories. With the small group in attendance a map of the neighbourhood was filled with new information and possible leads. 

A few of the leads discussed include a synagogue on the corner of Osler Street and Victoria Avenue and the Jewish community that used to live in that part of town. The group is also looking at the Carmichael church on 15th Avenue, where the first religious radio broadcast in Canada was beamed out, and other legacy projects to follow up on.

With files from Saskatchewan Weekend