Regina uses Dursban to control elm beetle

Some people in Regina are upset with the city because it uses Dursban for its yearly elm beetle spraying program.

Some residents concerned spray is toxic to humans

Some residents in Regina are upset with the city because it uses Dursban for its yearly elm beetle spraying program.

Some residents in Regina are upset with the city because of the product it chooses to use for its yearly elm beetle spraying program.

The city of Regina uses a product called Dursban to combat elm beetles. Some scientific studies argue Dursban could be toxic to humans. 

Dawn Suchoboki, a resident in northern Regina, said she asked the city to not spray her yard.

"The biggest concern for me is that it was a nerve toxin and it's very harmful to living beings,"  Suchoboki said. "Us people, our pets, and wildlife that's in our neighbourhoods and communities."

Ray Morgan, manager of forestry, pest control and horticulture, said the city doesn't spray recklessly.

"We concentrate on street trees and we target the low times of the day," Morgan said. "For example, 6 a.m. when public activity is quite low."

Morgan said the city is searching for safer alternatives that work just as well at controlling the elm beetle. He said most organic methods are very expensive.

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