Premier Brad Wall touts Sask. carbon sequestration project

Some premiers are sitting out today's climate change summit in Quebec City, but Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is there, talking up the province's efforts to capture and store carbon dioxide.

Premiers gather for climate change summit in Quebec City

Saskatchewan's premier is talking up the province's carbon sequestration project, in which carbon dioxide from a coal-burning power plant is pumped into underground caverns. (SaskPower)

Some premiers are sitting out today's climate change summit in Quebec City, but Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is there, talking up the province's efforts to capture and store carbon dioxide.

Wall made a presentation on carbon capture sequestration Tuesday morning. That's the technology being used at the Boundary Dam power station to pump CO2, which is produced by burning coal, deep underground instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.

Wall told an audience that the world needs to follow Saskatchewan's example if there are to be serious reductions in greenhouse emissions.

He noted that Canada is responsible for under two per cent of global CO2 emissions, while China accounts for 24.5 per cent of global emissions.

"We are kidding ourselves if we desire a positive global impact and are not focused on technological solutions to make worldwide base-load generation more sustainable," Wall said in a news release.

A weekend letter from Ottawa called on the provinces to do more about climate change and to provide better data on their progress meeting carbon reduction goals.

Alberta and Saskatchewan have higher-than-average greenhouse emissions per capita because of their oil industries.

However, Alberta Premier Jim Prentice and B.C. Premier Christie Clark are among those who won't be at the meeting.

Ontario is set to announce its participation in a cap-and-trade scheme for reducing emissions, while B.C. has a carbon tax.

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