Tanner Glass made a significant life-decision when he moved to Pittsburgh this summer.

After spending the past two seasons with the Winnipeg Jets and Vancouver Canucks, the Regina product signed a multi-year deal with the Pittsburgh Penguins in July.

With labour negotiations still moving slowly, a lot of NHL players are taking their game to Europe or the American Hockey League. For Glass, playing elsewhere is not appealing because he is trying to find a home with his wife.

During the first two weeks of the lockout, the couple lived in a Pittsburgh hotel.

"It was tough," Glass said. "Me and my wife were excited to get to Pittsburgh, having a two-year deal and wanting to put down some roots."

With the lockout dragging on, Glass is now training and house hunting in Vancouver.

Glass spent part of this summer training in Regina with power skating instructor Liane Davis. He's still keeping busy – skating at least four times per week – but Glass said he misses the physical element of his game.

"It's not hard to get mentally ready to go to the rink everyday because I love the game," Glass said. "But with my game I need to hit people and be physically engaged out there. So that can be kind of tricky."

When the lockout started, Glass wasn't considering playing hockey in Europe. 

"I'm not trying to just sit and practice for months on end but, at the same time, I'm not going to try and go to the KHL and hunt down a big contract or play in Siberia," Glass told CBC News during week one of the lockout. "We are looking for a combination of a good hockey experience and a good life experience."

Glass said he doesn't want to play in Russia, but he's now considering playing in Italy, Austria or England.

"I think it would be a real shame if we lost the season or if we even goes too far into the season," Glass said. "If it goes into later November or December, I'll definitely consider going (to Europe)."

As far as the labour negotiations, Glass said he supports the NHLPA's demands.

"I think it's just crazy to ask the players to foot the bill again," Glass said. "I'm pretty firmly behind what we are doing."