More Taser-trained police expected in Regina soon, chief says

After noting the introduction of stun guns, also known as Tasers, to more police officers in Saskatoon, Regina's chief of police says his force will also be training more members on how — and when — to use the devices.

After noting the introduction of stun guns, also known as Tasers, to more police officers in Saskatoon, Regina's chief of police says his force will also be training more members on how — and when — to use the devices.

In January of 2013, provincial authorities gave municipal police forces the OK to use stun guns. However, each city had to put together a training plan and policy that meets the approval of the Saskatchewan Police Commission.

Regina's chief of police, Troy Hagen, said Wednesday they are still working on getting members trained.

"The broader approval is there," Hagen said. "It's just, members have not been trained. So no one will be allowed to wear, deploy, or even handle the weapons until the appropriate training has been delivered. "

Under existing policies, only a SWAT member is authorized to carry a stun gun.

"It's going to take some time, obviously, to train all of our members," Hagen added. "You just can't do that overnight because we still have people working. So it's a big draw in terms of resources to have people pulled away from their duties to receive training.'

Each time the device is used, a police force is required to conduct a review.

The police commission says Tasers may only be used "in situations where there is imminent high risk of bodily harm to officers or the public and other use of force options would be ineffective or inappropriate."

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