Mobile Crisis workers in Regina hand in strike mandate

The union says its members are worried about working alone because it puts them in dangerous situations.

The union says working alone puts members in dangerous situations

Grant Nicurity, board chairman of Mobile Crisis Services, says they have to make difficult staffing decisions based on the resources they have. (CBC)

Mobile Crisis workers in Regina have given their union a strike mandate.

The union says its members are worried about working alone because it puts them in dangerous situations. In a statement, the union says there is a seven-hour window on weekdays when only one worker is on shift, and they want at least two people staffing the unit at all times to ensure safety for themselves and people who are vulnerable.

Regina Mobile Crisis Services provides a range of programs, from child protection and domestic abuse emergency intervention, to gambling counselling. 

They're not easy decisions to make, but you make them as best you can within the resources you have.- Grant Nicurity, board chairman

"As a result of working alone, crisis workers are experiencing mental exhaustion, ethical dilemmas, safety concerns, dropped calls and delays in providing services putting client safety at risk," said the union release.

In response, the board of directors said the unit is stretched for funding, and it has to make difficult scheduling decisions.

"It's based on what kinds of calls we get at what time of the day and all of those kinds of things go into these decisions," said Grant Nicurity, board chairman of Mobile Crisis Services. "So they're not easy decisions to make, but you make them as best you can within the resources you have."

Mobile Crisis said the non-profit organization is running a $50,000 deficit and is asking its contributors for more money.

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