Keystone XL delay a 'major blow' to energy industry: Sask.'s Brad Wall

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says the latest delay in a decision on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline is a major blow to Canada's energy industry.
Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall issued a news release expressing concerns over a move, by U.S. officials, to put off making a decision on approving the Keystone XL pipeline.

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says the latest delay in a decision on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline is a major blow to Canada's energy industry.

The U.S. State Department announced last week that it wants to give federal agencies more time to review the  $5.4-billion proposal by Calgary-based TransCanada.

Wall said Monday he is deeply concerned and calls the delay a major disappointment.

He noted the proposed pipeline has already passed the U.S. State Department's own environmental impact assessment.

The 2,700-kilometre line would move bitumen from Alberta's oilsands to refineries on the Gulf Coast of Texas. A portion of the route passes through Saskatchewan.

"The Keystone XL pipeline has been studied long and hard," Wall said in a release issued Monday. "The pipeline will create thousands of jobs on both sides of the border, offers a safe and efficient method of moving large volumes of oil, and, according to the State Department, will not contribute to a net increase in greenhouse gas emissions.

"This delay represents a major blow to the energy industry in Saskatchewan and in Canada and will place unnecessary strain on relations with our largest trading partner."

Wall said approval of the Keystone XL project is critical to the successful transport of other commodities in his province.

"Saskatchewan grain, potash, and other commodities suffer every day the Keystone XL pipeline is not being built," Wall said. "The United States needs to quit wavering and make a decision based on the facts, which support the construction of Keystone.

"These politically motivated decisions are hurting the Saskatchewan economy, the U.S. economy and our ability to develop new markets and support North America energy sustainability."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.