Fires started by children down dramatically, Regina fire officials say

There's been a dramatic decline in fires caused by children, but fires caused by new Canadians are a growing concern, Regina fire officials say.

Cooking-related fires increasing across all demographic groups

A report to city hall says child-caused fires have dropped dramatically in number over a decade. (Arielle Zerr/CBC News)

There's been a dramatic decline in fires caused by children, but fires caused by new Canadians are a growing concern, Regina fire officials say.

A report going to Regina City Council today says while there were 42 house fires caused by children playing with matches or lighters in 2003, 10 years later the number had dropped to two.

The city notes that the 2003 was the peak and the numbers declined steadily after.

As well, an epidemic of garbage fires in the early years of the 21st century was later greatly reduced.

Countering the trend in child-related fires and garbage fires is an increase in cooking-related fires.

"Cooking-related responses across all demographic groups have increased significantly city-wide," the report to council says.

Reports indicate that new Canadians are an emerging high-risk group, the report says.

Earlier this month, dozens of apartment residents were left homeless when a cooking-related fire destroyed the building.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.