Heavy rain over the weekend has added to flood concerns for a number of people in the RM of Corman Park.

Many farmyards in the area were still struggling with standing water from flooding earlier in the spring and this latest rain has added to worries that they may be cut off from the rest of the area.

The Beaulac family had just moved back home Wednesday after a flood washed out their driveway in April, preventing them from accessing their house eight kilometres north of Warman.

Stacy Beaulac said her family is located in a problem area because the roads are in rough shape and the water isn't draining.

"I can't go south because my van wouldn't make it down the dip and go back up. And then north of it it's so muddy that I almost went in the ditch the other day trying to get through it," said Beaulac, who added that safety is her main concern.

"We have three young kids and if something were to happen I don't know if we could get out and get any medical aid or any medical aid get in," said Stacy Beaulac.

"There's no way an ambulance could get down these roads if any of these farms had a problem."

The family had to move their house once already because the new 305 Highway is being built where they were.

Beaulac said in addition to the driveway, which collapsed in April, water has also flooded their barn and a detached garage, where they and stored some belonging temporarily. Beaulac said she expects it won't dry up until September this year.

Beaulac said the RM is doing what it can to help remove the water.

Cost of drainage upgrades $20 million  

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The RM of Corman Park is dealing with more flooding, several raods have been washedout making it hard for some people to leave their home. (Courtesy Luke Beaulac)

Nearby dairy and beef producers are also affected by the flooding, said Bas Forese-Kooijenga, a councillor with the rural municipality.

He said the beef operation is limited to 10 acres for cows and calves.

"A little farther north is a dairy farm that's pretty much surrounded by water," said Forese-Kooijenga. "The cows are limited to the barns and a little area in between."

He said the truck that drives in to pick up milk is still coming in, but it not easy to get through the area.

The RM had crews working over the weekend to try to clear up the problem, but it's not able to use graders, which can do more damage than good.

"Everything that can hold water is holding water and I guess now we realize that, you know, there is some serious upgrading to be done if this is going to be the new normal," said Forese-Kooijenga.

He said Corman Park and neighbouring communities are looking at four different projects to deal with flood mitigation.

"The total cost will be about $20 million, so you know, once we figure out what we want to do we also have to make sure we're going to get the funding," he said.

"I think we do need the provincial government to help out with that because it's more than any of us could afford."