City of Regina proposes 4.3% property tax increase

Regina taxpayers could be digging deeper into their wallets next year, according to the 2015 budget that calls for a 4.3 per cent property tax increase.

Water, sewer rates set to go up 8 per cent

Nobody likes tax hikes, but they are necessary to run the city, Mayor Michael Fougere says. (Tory Gillis/CBC)

Regina taxpayers could be digging deeper into their wallets next year, according to the 2015 budget that calls for a 4.3 per cent property tax increase.

On Friday, officials released the preliminary operating, water and sewer utility budgets, as well as the capital budget.

They suggest many people will be paying a couple of hundred dollars more in 2015.

'People don't want to see taxes go up but we also have to run the city.' - Mayor Michael Fougere

The 4.3 per cent proposed tax increase includes 1 per cent that will be dedicated to fixing residential streets.

Also included in the total is this year's hike to the stadium tax — roughly 0.45 per cent.

Water and sewer prices will go up 8 per cent, if the proposed increases are approved.

"People don't want to see taxes go up but we also have to run the city," Mayor Michael Fougere said.

The city provided details on what the increases will cost typical residents:

  • For a homeowner with a $300,000 house, the total city tax bill will be about $2,457 (school, library taxes are extra).
  • Taxes on a $300,000 house will increase $101.28 next year.
  • Water and sewer rate increases will mean the average user will pay $126 more.

Regina City Council will have final say on all budget matters.

Among those reacting to the budget Friday was the Regina & District Chamber of Commerce, which said it generally supports the direction the city is taking, but would like to see it bring the tax hike below 4 per cent.

The 2014 operating budget approved in February boosted taxes by 5.88 per cent (including 1 per cent for residential streets). As well, water and sewer in 2014 went up 8 per cent.

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