Carol LaFayette-Boyd, 75, smashed five world track and field records in her age category at a recent championship in Saskatchewan.

The Regina senior established records in long jump (3.85 metres), high jump (1.23 metres), the 100-metre (15.15 seconds), the 200-metre (32.83 seconds) and triple jump (8.19 metres). The championships were held in Regina earlier this month.

"It's not about the records or being No. 1, but about having fun," she said, though she acknowledged others are a bit more excited.

"My grandchildren are sharing it with the whole world. My 12-year-old granddaughter always jokes about me being called 'sir,' because I keep my hair so short, and she sent a message saying 'nobody can beat my grandfather,'" she chuckled.

Starting at 50

LaFayette-Boyd's path to success wasn't a straightforward one. She described track and field as the furthest thing from her mind most of her life.

Carol LaFayette-Boyd

LaFayette-Boyd described meeting fellow athletes from around the world as one of the sport's greatest rewards. (Submitted by Carol LaFayette-Boyd)

"I started back when I was 50, and at the time I didn't even know there was track for 'old people.' I thought there was just distance running," she said.

After reaching out to a coach from days as a high school student, LaFayette-Boyd learned about Canadian Master Athletics — active athletic training and competitions for "the young at heart."

Since then, LaFayette-Boyd has been "hooked."

"It keeps me healthy and active in my community, and I love meeting people from all over the world."

She described it as a labour of love, adding there is a bit of work she has to put in to stay on top. She rides her bike, does weight exercises, stretches and meets with her track club three times a week.

LaFayette-Boyd has some simple advice for other seniors looking to get active: find something you love.