Brad Wall open to private liquor outlets, if voters insist

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says he will consider a move to non-government owned liquor stores, but only if voters insist on such a change.
Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says he is willing to consider non-government liquor stores, if voters insist upon such a move. (CBC)

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall says he will consider a move to non-government owned liquor stores, but only if voters insist on such a change.

"If we get a sense that that is what people want we may, possibly, campaign that in the next election," Wall told reporters in Regina Wednesday. "But we would never change that without a mandate to do so."

He noted that, for now, the province will not open any additional Crown-owned stores nor sell any.

"The policy of the government is that while we're not selling existing stores today, any new stores will be ... private stores," Wall said.

He added he wants Saskatchewan Party MLAs to consult their constituents on the question.

"I'm simply saying to our MLAs, find out if people are interested in more of that, would they like to see more private stores," Wall said.

The next provincial election is expected to take place in April 2016.

Wall said the discussion is not about privatizing Crown corporations, which are protected under legislation.

"That's not at all what we're talking about here. We're talking about checking with Saskatchewan people about what they see for the future of liquor sales in the province," he said.


Replay the live chat below, or if you'd like to weigh in, leave your thoughts in the comment section.

Join online host Matt Kruchak from Monday to Friday between 6-8:45 a.m. on cbc.ca/saskatoon for a lively and engaging live chat. While chatting, tune into Saskatoon Morning on 94.1 FM with host Leisha Grebinski.

With files from The Canadian Press

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.