Which Saskatchewan executive got paid the most in 2014?

The former CEO of Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan raked in millions in 2014, but it turns out he was slightly below average on the top 100 list for Canadian executive pay.

Retired CEO's $8.69M put him on top of the list, 38th place in Canada

Two Saskatchewan executives made the list of the 100 Canadian executives paid the most in 2014. (Getty Images/Gallo Images)

The former CEO of Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan raked in millions in 2014, but it turns out he was slightly below average on the top 100 list for Canadian executive pay. However, he only worked until July of that year before retiring.

Bill Doyle, who was also president of the Saskatoon-based mining giant, received $8.69 million, according to an annual CEO salary roundup released this week by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

That's slightly below the $8.96 million hauled in on average by Canadian corporate titans on the top 100 list.

Doyle's 2014 haul included $1.39 million in base salary, $1.24 million in bonuses, $4.1 million in stock options, $1.84 million in pension and $181,606 in other types of compensation, the report said.

PotashCorp's Bill Doyle announced his retirement as CEO in 2014, but stayed on as a special advisor to the company until last year. (CBC)

Doyle's compensation put him at 38th place on the top 100 list.

The only other CEO of a Saskatchewan-based company that made the list was Cameco's Tim Gitzel.

The CCPA report says he hauled in about $5.1 million in 2014 ($936,900 in base salary, $1.1 million in bonuses, $1.7 million in shares, $1.1 million in stock options and $272,700 in pension contributions).

Gitzel was in 81st place on the list.

Topping the compensation list for 2014 was John Chen of Blackberry, who pulled in $89.7 million.

The centre says its report is based on an analysis of the earnings of CEOs of the Canadian corporations in the TSX Index, as reported in proxy circulars issued in 2015. 

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