YOUR COMMENTS

Opening adoption records an emotional issue for Islanders

Islanders are divided on whether the province should move to open up its adoption records.

Some argue that people have the right to know, while others feel that peoples' privacy should be maintained

Under P.E.I. Adoption Act, records are considered sealed. Identities of the parties involved can only be revealed after those people have given their consent. (Kerry Campbell/CBC)

Islanders are divided on whether the province should move to open up its adoption records.

Public consultations get underway next week but the review committee struck to conduct the consultations have already begun meeting privately with some groups. 

Under P.E.I. legislation, the province's adoption records are considered sealed. Identities of the parties involved can only be revealed after those people have given their consent.

We posted the story to the CBC P.E.I. Facebook page, and many readers shared their comments. 

Some argue it's important to maintain peoples' privacy, while others feel it's necessary to provide information for those wanting to find out more about their biological family.

(Please note that usernames are not necessarily the names of commenters. Some comments have been altered to correct spelling and conform to CBC style.)

'Great source of anxiety'

"I need this. I've put a lot of effort into searching with no results and it's something I've thought about daily since the age of five," said Jason Philip Peters.

"The time lost from constantly pondering ... has surely put some ripples in my life and has been a great source of anxiety."

Allan Quinn agreed, and said not having access to records can mean anxiety and depression for those looking for answers. 

"[It's] a loss of self identity, emotional trauma wondering why you don't look like the others in the family," he said. "It's a lifetime of grief but also a lifetime of feeling like you weren't good enough."

Having access to that information would also be helpful for people wanting to know about their family's health history, said Marolyn Matthews.

'Some people don't want to be found'

But Ashley McLellan, who was adopted, said she'd like to see records remain closed.

"Honestly, this is not something that I am interested in seeing come to fruition," she said. "The last thing I want is a stranger contacting me saying they're my bio family. I have a family, I don't need or want another one."

Meronda Trainor said peoples' privacy needs to be maintained if that's what they choose.

"Some people don't want to be found ... if somebody wants to remain anonymous they have that right," she said.

With files from Kerry Campbell