A new partnership between the Workers Compensation Board and Brain Injury Association of Prince Edward Island aims to reduce risk of brain injury on the job.

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Luanne Gallant of the Workers Compensation Board is reminding employers to be aware of potential hazards, especially those that may not seem obvious. (LinkedIn)

In a written statement, Luanne Gallant, acting chief executive officer for the Workers Compensation Board, underlined the importance of monitoring "the prevalence and impact of workplace injuries related to concussion and minor traumatic brain injuries."

Gallant points out that while the number of claims related to these injuries is not high, these injuries "can have a higher duration with symptoms lasting longer than other injuries." 

According to the Workers Compensation Board, 160,000 Canadians sustain brain injuries each year and that number is on the rise.  

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Kenneth Murnaghan, director of the Brain Injury Association of P.E.I., is pleased with the new campaign. (CBC)

Kenneth Murnaghan, director of the Brain Injury Association of P.E.I., said the new partnership will highlight the importance of safety on the job.

"We are happy to be partnering with the Workers Compensation Board on raising awareness of brain injuries through this poster campaign," he said in the statement.

"It is important to remember that concussions happen often, including the workplace," said Murnaghan.

The Workers Compensation Board has produced new posters, reminding employers to be aware of potential hazards, especially those that may not seem obvious.

"Simple steps like wearing protective headgear, applying anti-slip strips to stair treads and salting walkways and parking lots could help avoid slips, trips and falls," the statement said.