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The tin roof was ripped off the Boat Shop Steak and Seafood Restaurant in Northport, P.E.I. during Saturday's storm. ((CBC))

Powerful winds and higher-than-normal tides combined to cause destructive storm surges and damage across P.E.I. over the weekend.

Most of the damage occurred between 10 p.m. and midnight Saturday. At the height of the storm up to 20,000 Maritime Electric customers were without power, and police in Charlottetown closed some roads because of flooding.

Wind gusts clocked in at 103 km/h at North Cape and peaked at 90 km/h in other parts of the Island. 

The wind whipped the tin roof completely off the Boat Shop Steak and Seafood Restaurant in Northport, a small community in northwestern P.E.I.

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"The roof itself, what's left of the metal, is all peeled back like a banana, really," said Cathy Bullied, who has owned the restaurant for four years. She's confident repairs will be done in time for the summer tourism season.

Other Northport locals said the gusts were the strongest they'd felt in decades.

"You could hear like a whistling noise from it, eh? It was actually scary," said Dave Gaudet, a long-time resident of Northport.

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Saturday night's storm surge flooded several areas of Charlottetown. ((CBC))

While wind was the problem up west, other areas of the province were also dealing with flooding.

At one point Saturday night, the wharf at Nine Mile Creek was under one metre of water, said mussel fisherman Gerry MacDonald.

"I came down at 11:30 and couldn't get down. The tide was too high," said MacDonald. "And it washed all the ice up over the road. And the water was on the road too."

In Charlottetown, flooding temporarily forced the closure of Water Street and Victoria Park.

By Sunday morning, most of that part of the city was back to normal.

Although Charlottetown public works officials said there isn't much that can be done to prevent the kind of flooding that occurred in this location, Mayor Clifford Lee said improvements might be made by increasing the height of the stones in certain areas.