What are Canada’s most important headlines?

A national newspaper association is using the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation to highlight some of the most important headlines in Canadian history. It's asking readers to pick the best ones.

Canadians can vote on their favourite front pages

2014 marks 150 years since the idea of Canadian Confederation took shape in Charlottetown. It also marks 150 years of newspaper headlines, documenting the evolution of a nation. (CBC)

A national newspaper association is using the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation to highlight some of the most important headlines in Canadian history, and it's asking readers to pick the best ones.

This year marks 150 years since the idea of Canadian Confederation took shape in Charlottetown.

Headlines from the time tell the story of a young Canada trying to find its place and tell its own stories.

“Newspapers really are the medium of record for Canada's history and I think it's a great project that we can show that record to Canadians and actually then have Canadians judge who's the best and what's the most interesting element of that history,” said John Hinds, the association’s president.

Newspapers from around the country submitted their picks in categories like Canadian politics, Canadian heroes, Canada at war and Canadian sports.

“So Canada has changed as a country and we get a clear sense of that through our headlines,” said Hinds.

P.E.I. 2014 is a partner on the project.

“Nine of the fathers of Confederation were in the newspaper business so there's some interesting linkages there,” said the group’s executive director Penny Walsh-McGuire.

“There's some pretty impactful stories that are being presented by newspapers right across our country.”

Canadians can vote for their favourites online, beginning in June.

The winning newspapers will be announced in September and displayed in Charlottetown.

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