A team of volunteer veterinarians from the Atlantic Veterinary College in P.E.I. has returned from a trip to Labrador to treat animals where medical attention is hard to find.

Jason Gray

Student Jason Gray says the program is a wonderful learning opportunity. (CBC)

The Chinook Project has been taking veterinarians and veterinary students north to remote communities for almost a decade. 

In many of Canada's remote northern communities, there are no trained vets to take care of sick animals. 

“We pack up a mobile clinic and we ship it all up to a northern community,” said Dr. Peter Foley with the AVC. 

He said in the last few years they’ve also been to Nunavut. 

'You’re practising your spays and your neuters and off you go'- Jason Gray

Labrador's Department of Natural Resources provides $15,000 in funding but the work is all volunteer. 

This year eight students and six veterinarians were part of the team. 

Husky

In many of Canada's northern communities, there are no trained vets to take care of sick animals. (CBC)

“You’re practising your spays and your neuters and off you go,” said student Jason Gray. “It’s a wonderful learning opportunity. It’s high volume, its a lot of stress, your’re working hard, but you’re learning so much. Its great.”

Despite the pressure of seeing a lot of animals in a short period, Gray said he enjoyed his time with the project. 

“I would love to have the opportunity to come and participate in this project when I have more experience as veterinarian and I can come and coach the students.”