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Striking Canadian Blood Services workers get help from P.E.I. unions

Striking Canadian Blood Services workers in Charlottetown got some extra support on the picket line Monday from representatives of several different unions.

Dozens of other union members on P.E.I. offer emotional and financial support

Canadian Blood Services workers in Charlottetown get support Monday from other workers. 1:06

Striking Canadian Blood Services workers in Charlottetown got some extra support on the picket line Monday from representatives of several different unions.

The strike began last Monday. The 11 part-time workers at the Charlottetown office say they have been without a contract since March of 2011.

Dozens of members from others unions walked the picket line with them today, including the P.E.I. Union of Public Sector Employees.

UPSE president Debbie Bovyer said it was important to show support.

"They were very, very appreciative that UPSE took the initiative to organize and invite all the other unions on P.E.I. to participate," said Bovyer.

"It lifted their spirits again, got them back into that drive. They are smiling again. They don't feel that they are run down so much and they are committed to going forward now that they know they have lots of support."

'The boost we need for a Monday morning.'

Some of the other unions included CUPE, UNIFOR, and the P.E.I. Federation of Labour. They also took up a collection to provide some financial support as well.

Striking blood services workers got some help on the picket line Monday morning from other unions. (Rick Gibbs CBC)

Tanya Herrell, president of the local union, said it was wonderful to get the extra help.

"It just lifted our spirits and gave us the boost we need for a Monday morning. It's great to have the support of other unions and other people."

The striking employees, who work part-time, said the main issue in the labour dispute is a need for guaranteed hours.

Meanwhile Canadian Blood Services officials say despite the strike, the blood needs of Islanders are still being met.

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