RCMP policing cost increases too much, says Borden-Carleton mayor

Island communities policed by the RCMP will be paying five per cent more for the coverage this year and the mayor of Borden-Carleton says that's too much.

'For a small community, it's a substantial increase,' says Mayor Dean Sexton

Borden-Carleton Mayor Dean Sexton is also unhappy with how the RCMP price increase was communicated. (CBC)

Island communities policed by the RCMP will be paying five per cent more for the coverage this year and the mayor of Borden-Carleton says that's too much.

"For a small community, it's a substantial increase," said Mayor Dean Sexton.

There are five other P.E.I. municipalities with similar contracts with the province.

Not only is Sexton unhappy about the increase, he's not pleased with how it was communicated. Sexton learned about the increase on Monday night when he received a phone call from a reporter.

Sexton says in the past, municipal officials would meet with officials from the province and the RCMP.

"It wasn't done that way this time," he said.

Up until four years ago, Borden-Carleton had its own police force, which consisted of two full-time officers and one who worked half of the time. To cut costs, Borden-Carleton got rid of its force and signed a contract to get 40 hours of weekly police coverage from the RCMP through its East Prince detachment.

Over the last three years, the amount Borden-Carleton has paid for coverage has increased 13 per cent, including a five per cent jump coming into effect this April.

With this latest increase, Sexton says alternatives will be explored.

"I believe we're really going to have to look at another way of doing policing," he said.

Sexton says the town will look into receiving police services from either Kensington or Summerside. However, because the town must provide a year's notice to terminate the agreement, there isn't much it can do right now.

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