Pride P.E.I. uses rainbow hockey tape to send a powerful message

Pride P.E.I. is reaching out to Island hockey teams to get involved in a new national campaign to stop homophobia in sports. Pride Tape is hockey tape in the six rainbow colours of the Pride flag, an initiative that was started at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

'It's all about ending homophobia in sports'

A colourful new campaign aims to encourage LGBTQ athletes to stay in the game by encouraging hockey players to decorate their sticks with the six colours of the Pride flag. (University of Alberta)
Pride P.E.I. is reaching out to Island hockey teams to get involved in a new national campaign to stop homophobia in sports.
Tyler Murnaghan, chair of Pride P.E.I., says Pride Tape is a way to get out the message about inclusiveness on sports teams. (CBC)

Pride Tape is hockey tape in the six rainbow colours of the pride flag, an initiative that was started at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. 

Pride P.E.I. says that when hockey players wrap their sticks in the tape, it sends a powerful message that everyone is welcome on the ice, regardless of sexual orientation.

'Every day we have athletes coming out.- Tyler Murnaghan, Pride P.E.I.

Tyler Murnaghan, the chair of Pride P.E.I., says his group is offering the rainbow tape to minor league teams and the Charlottetown Islanders — for free.  

"It's all about ending homophobia in sports. I mean everyday we have athletes coming out, sharing their stories and they're always saying the same thing, that they were scared, that they were never going to be accepted, that they were never going to be able to go anywhere because of who they were," Murnaghan said.

Pride Tape organizers in Edmonton have a crowd-funding campaign on the go to raise money for the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services at the University of Alberta and the You Can Play initiative.

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