Rainbow Flag raised at Charlottetown city hall, Province House

Charlottetown is joining cities across the country who are raising the Rainbow Flag in support of LGBT rights for people in Russia.

P.E.I. joins places across Canada standing up for LGBT rights in Russia

On Tuesday, a rainbow flag climbed the flagpole in front of Province House, in solidarity with people in the LGBT community. (Kate McKenna/CBC)

Charlottetown is joining cities across the country who are raising the Rainbow Flag in support of LGBT rights for people in Russia.

The Olympic host country has come under fire from many in the international community after controversial anti-gay legislation was recently passed.

Cities including Halifax, Saint John, Fredericton, St. John’s and many others are flying the symbol for LGBT rights during the Olympics, saying the legislation Russia passed casts a shadow over the games.

On Monday, Charlottetown City Hall hoisted the Pride Flag. On Tuesday, a rainbow flag climbed the flagpole in front of Province House, in solidarity with people in the LGBT community.

“I think we're going about it the right way. Raising the flag is a symbol that people can see and it's peaceful,” said Shawna MacAusland, with the Abegweit Rainbow Collective of P.E.I.

“It's a peaceful way to show support without getting into word confrontations or arguments about who's right and who's wrong,”

Around the globe, and even in Sochi, protesters have taken to the street to speak out against Russia’s policy to persecute some in the LGBT community .

Charlottetown Mayor Clifford Lee said raising the flag is the Island's way of showing support.

"It's a thing that's been done all over Canada to be honest and it's a way to show support for the athletes and really, in this day and age, to say, 'We in Charlottetown, we in P.E.I., are not supportive of the rules in Russia in regards to the gay and lesbian community,’" Lee said.

Both the city and the province say they plan to fly the flag until the end of the Olympic Games.

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