Testimony Friday morning at the trial of Joel Clow explored his relationship with Traci Lynch in the months before her death.

Clow is on trial for first degree murder in the death of Lynch on July 24, 2015, in Pleasant Grove, P.E.I.

Rachel Decourcey of Scotchfort, P.E.I., who described herself as a friend of Lynch told court Lynch was frightened of Clow. Decourcey testified she had a conversation with Lynch July 17, 2015, days before Lynch's death. 

Lynch told her Clow had tried to run her down with his vehicle, so Lynch had run way, she testified.

Decourcey also testified Lynch showed her a roll of money Clow had given Lynch. Lynch told Decourcey Clow had damaged windows in her car. and the money was to cover the repairs.

"He's sucking up," Lynch said, according to Decourcey.

Judge to rule on admissibility

The Crown and defence lawyers made submissions Friday afternoon about whether her testimony and that of eight other witnesses who've taken the stand this week should be submitted as evidence in this trial.

The court heard from five of Lynch's friends, one of Clow's and two police officers, called by the Crown. Defence also called an expert in pharmacology, Peter Mullen, to testify under the voir dire.

Clow's lawyer, Joel Pink, argued Lynch's feelings of being under threat from Clow may have been the result of paranoia or psychosis.

The Crown, Cindy Wedge, said the evidence should be admitted because it shows three things: Lynch was afraid of Clow; Clow was hostile toward Lynch; and that hostility forms the basis for Clow forming intent to commit murder.

Justice Nancy Key will rule Tuesday on the admissibility.

Flowers purchased in days before death

Other evidence showed Joel Clow purchased flowers two days before Lynch's death.

RCMP officer Irwin VanWesterneng testified a grocery store receipt found in Clow's truck, dated July 22, 2015, included a purchase of roses and daisies.

Defence expert takes stand

The defence called an expert to the witness stand to discuss the effects of drugs.

Dr. Peter Mullen is a pharmacologist in Kentville, Nova Scotia.

Mullen testified methamphetamine can trigger psychotic episodes, even after a person has stopped taking the drug.

Court has heard Clow and Lynch were methamphetamine users.

Under cross examination by Crown prosecutor Jeff MacDonald, Mullen agreed that he had not examined the medical records of Clow and Lynch, and was not commenting on them specifically.

Corrections

  • An earlier version of this story stated Justice Nancy Key would rule on the admissibility of eight witnesses who gave testimony in voire dire. In fact, it is nine witnesses.
    May 23, 2017 11:26 AM AT