French heritage sites, attractions on P.E.I. highlighted in national tourism campaign

Twelve francophone tourist locations on Prince Edward Island are among hundreds across Canada in a newly created Francophone Heritage, Cultural and Tourism Corridor.

'I think that will give them way more visibility than we had in the past'

A new francophone tourism corridor includes about 130 total heritage sites and 160 tourist locations across Canada. The website has dozens of videos, photo displays and more. (Submitted)

Twelve French heritage and tourist locations on Prince Edward Island are among hundreds across Canada in the newly created Francophone Heritage, Cultural and Tourism Corridor.

Gilles Arsenault, a development officer with RDÉE P.E.I., says tourists can now plan their visits to the province, and Canada with the help of the new program.

There are ... many different attractions and cultural, historical sites pertaining to the Acadians and to the francophones.— Gilles Arsenault

"We were very excited to be able to promote this new website for tourists that would want to travel throughout the country," he said.

"And invite them to, obviously, come to Prince Edward Island and visit many different French tourist attractions."

Hundreds of francophone attractions

The corridor is a national tourism campaign pinpointing French heritage sites and attractions across the country on its Corridor Canada website.

It launched in Ottawa this week and is a project two years in the making. The website includes about 130 total heritage sites and 160 tourist locations, featuring dozens of videos, photo displays and more.

Some of the heritage sites on the Island include the Acadian Museum of P.E.I. in Miscouche, The Skmaqn-Port-La-Joye-Fort Amherst National Park in Rocky Point and The Farmers' Bank of Rustico Museum and Doucet House.

A few of the tourist attractions highlighted are the Acadian Musical Village in Abram-Village, the Bottle Houses in Cape Egmont and the Atlantic Fiddlers' Jamboree in Mont-Carmel.

More visibility

Arsenault said the website will help tourists find French-centered activities, events and services in areas across the country.

"There are main attractions on Prince Edward Island, but there are also ... cultural, historical sites pertaining to the Acadians and to the francophones as well," he said.

The corridor was launched in Ottawa this week and is a nation-wide project two years in the making. (Submitted)

"I think that will give them way more visibility than we had in the past."

Though P.E.I. currently has 12 places listed, the province is allowed up to 20.

With files from John Robertson