P.E.I. schools need policies on how to help students with Type 1 diabetes, says the Canadian Diabetes Association.

Cases of Type 1 diabetes is quickly growing among school-aged children, according to the association. But it said many schools aren't prepared to properly deal with the care needed for the complex condition.

'Type 1 diabetes requires several insulin shots throughout the day and not every child is comfortable taking out a needle and doing that in front of their peers.' – Terry Lewis

"Diabetes is a condition that requires 24/7 management," Terry Lewis,  manager of community engagement, Atlantic Canada, for the diabetes association, said on CBC Mainstreet.

"Type 1 diabetes requires several insulin shots throughout the day and not every child is comfortable taking out a needle and doing that in front of their peers."

P.E.I. is the only province in Atlantic Canada that doesn't have guidelines around students with diabetes, he said.

New campaign

A new campaign launched this week called Diabetes at School aims to change that.

"There are similar policies in place in regard to other things, peanut allergies for example," Lewis said.

"We're advocating on behalf of kids in school to ensure there are policies and guidelines in place for the management of diabetes while they're at school."

Lewis said the diabetes association has met with P.E.I.'s Department of Education, who agreed the issue is important but gave no firm time commitment for when a policy would be implemented.

With files from CBC Mainstreet